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Damsels in Distress

Parental supervision required for children under 12.
As rated by visitors:

Damsels In Distress is a sharp, deftly eccentric delight.

Empire

Director Whit Stillman (The Last Days of Disco) returns after a 13-year hiatus with this joyous, wonderfully peculiar campus comedy about a group of beautiful but odd girls who, fed up with low standards and the boorish male-dominated environment, set out to revolutionize university life. Led by the somewhat delusional but well-meaning Violet (played by indie queen Greta Gerwig, Greenberg), the dynamic group try to rescue the fellow students of their East Coast university, extending their help to the clinically depressed by setting up the ‘suicide prevention centre’ where they obliviously dole out free doughnuts and tap-dancing classes, though the girls themselves are prone to mishaps, becoming entangled with the very boys they are rallying against.

Director(s): Whit Stillman   Country of Origin: United States  Year: 2011   Running Time: 1hr 39 mins  
BBFC Advice: 12A Parental supervision required for children under 12.  

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Film Club said...

A minority of the Film Club felt that Damsels in Distress was a whimsical, charming insight into a certain milieu which the director was very familiar with, that of a sub-Ivy League American college. In their view the film was layered and gradually revealed its true soul.


They saw this piece as a recognisable follow-up to the director's previous films, Metropolitan, Barcelona and Last Days of Disco with additional music and dance, and therefore well worth watching.


For the majority of the Film Club, however, Damsels in Distress was pointless, banal and a complete waste of time!

4 years ago

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